Here’s to Type 2

Though type 1 and type 2 are both under the “diabetes umbrella,” it does not mean they are one in the same. I have type 1 diabetes, so a vast majority of my posts will be directed to those in the Type 1 community. Here is a post more for those who are dealing with type 2 diabetes.

I recently got an e-mail from the American Recall Center asking me to do a blog post about their new website, so I thought I would do a little bit of research.

American Recall Center | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

The American Recall Center is a new medical information site aimed at bringing consumers the most up-to-date FDA information in easy to understand, plain language terms. In research, I found that there are no other sites out there with the same mission: to make complicated medical information easy to understand. That’s why I’m so excited about this new endeavor!

The American Recall Center is focused on empowering individuals with medical information. They cover a large variety of medical information from prescription and medical device safety, to how maintain a healthy lifestyle. All of their writing is very straightforward and in easy terms, so that everyone can leave with a better understanding of information covered.

I did a search for “diabetes,” and came up with an article called Understanding Your Diabetes Medication by Debra Gordon.  The article was very interesting, and I thought it could help a lot of those who are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes…. and I again stress this because Type 1 is not preventable! And Type 1’s can not take oral medication.

For those dealing with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, remember, no matter what medications you’re taking, diet and exercise must be a part of your quest to manage your diabetes. But if you’re doing everything right and your blood glucose remains stubbornly high, it’s time to ask your doctor about next steps.

2014 Walk to Cure Diabetes

I’ve been doing the Western NY Chapter and the Westchester County Chapter JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes since 2001. It’s that time of the year again to begin my efforts for the Western New York Chapter being held at Delaware Park in Buffalo, NY on June 8th, 2014.

My team is Calla’s Crusaders and we are taking steps to help JDRF achieve its goal of improving the lives of all people affected by type 1 diabetes (T1D) by accelerating progress on the most promising opportunities for curing, better treating, and preventing T1D. By joining our walk team or making a donation, you will be helping us to raise funds to directly support research with the greatest potential to conquer this disease.Make A Donation to JDRF and support Calla's Crusaders in the 2014 Walk to Cure Diabetes | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

teamwalkpage

The JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes is a fun, happy, healthy, and effective way to show your support for all those living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to raise funds for JDRF—the leading global organization focused on T1D research.

Calla Rusch, the team captain, has been a type 1 diabetic (T1D) for the last 17 years, since she was 9 years old. She is currently on an OmniPod insulin pump, which controls blood sugars levels better, but still is not a cure for diabetes. She also uses the Dexcom CGM to continuously monitor her blood sugar levels.
Watch My Diabetes Story | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

We are motivated by the courage and perseverance of those facing the everyday challenges of type 1 diabetes – they are the reason we challenge ourselves to give more, to do more, to achieve more. We challenge ourselves to make a real difference in the lives of those with T1D.

This year, I am expanding my efforts to raise money for JDRF by selling our specially made Calla’s Crusaders T-Shirts online. As of right now, they are pre-sale and will be available for shipping sometime in May.

Buy a Calla's Crusaders T-Shirt to Show Diabetes Support | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

Spring Forward – Diabetic Style!

Spring Forward Diabetic Style | What devices do you need to change the time on? | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

This whole “clock changing” thing always gets me off my normal diabetic schedule. This morning I woke up to my alarm at 7:30. I got up, got dressed and started to get ready for work… yes, I work on Sunday mornings!

I checked my blood sugar level. I double checked the number with my CGM. I looked up at the clock in the kitchen while eating my breakfast. 6:55 am. WTF?!? Oh yeah, clocks went back! For a moment there, I felt relieved that I could relax for a little bit… but I guess life just can’t be that easy.

I ran off to work. My car clock is always the first thing that needs to be changed. I can’t stand it when it’s off — and it makes me think too much.  The clock in the car is the thing I look at the most when checking the time…. because I am constantly checking the time!

Secondly is my meter. I don’t want to have all of these weird blood sugar readings for different time schedules. And I also get different amounts of basil (insulin units per hour) at different times throughout the day. On OmniPod it can get complicated because you need to “suspend” yourself when your changing the time. Then you go to settings — system setup — date/time — “edit” (in the right hand corner).

My morning started off as a high because of not changing my clock forward one hour.  Currently, I only receive .90 units of insulin per hour from 3am-9am because I tend to go low overnight.  After 9am, it kicks in to 1.75 units of insulin per hour. Since I didn’t change the clock on my meter immediately when I woke up, I didn’t start receiving my 1.75 basil rate until about 10am. My breakfast defeated me this morning. I went high. And it wasn’t til about 2pm that I was able to fix it.

Next thing for a Type 1 Diabetic like myself to change is the CGM. That’s an easy one… at least with Dexcom it is. Simply go to settings — date/time — and change the time.

Time changes can get complicated, even for the best of us diabetics. Keep your head up, ‘cuz it will get better! How many devices did you have to change today? What ones are they?

Here’s Mine:How to Change the time on OmniPod Insulin Pump and Dexcom CGM  | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

2014 Walk to Cure Diabetes

We are taking steps to help JDRF achieve its goal of improving the lives of all people affected by type 1 diabetes (T1D) by accelerating progress on the most promising opportunities for curing, better treating, and preventing T1D. By joining our Walk Team and making a donation, you will be helping us to raise funds to directly support research with the greatest potential to conquer this disease.

Calla Rusch, the team captain, has been a type 1 diabetic (T1D) for the last 17 years, since she was 9 years old. She is currently on an OmniPod insulin pump, which controls blood sugars levels better, but still is not a cure for diabetes. She also uses a Dexcom CGM to continuously monitor her blood glucose (sugar) levels.

Many people think type 1 diabetes can be controlled by insulin. While insulin does keep people with type 1 diabetes alive, it is NOT a cure, just a temporary solution. There are many daily challenges for people living with type 1 diabetes, there are many severe, often fatal, complications caused by the disease. Type 1, or juvenile, diabetes, is a devastating, often deadly disease that affects millions of people–a large and growing percentage of them children.

Click here to watch Calla’s story: http://www.youtube.com/iamatype1diabetic

We are motivated by the courage and perseverance of those facing the everyday challenges of type 1 diabetes – they are the reason we challenge ourselves to give more, to do more, to achieve more. We challenge ourselves to make a real difference in the lives of those with T1D.
Will you accept the challenge to make a difference? All you need you to do is click on the “Donate” button, make a donation, and pass along to your friends and family. It’s simple, fast, and fun!

All donations are tax deductible. Thank you for your support and for helping JDRF to create a world without T1D.

Donate to JDRF - Calla's Crusaders | www.iamatype1diabetic.comJoin Calla's Crusaders in the Walk to Cure Diabetes | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

Calibrate on a Steady Trend

Calibrate on a Steady Trend | www.iamatype1diabetic.com

As this image illustrates, you can enhance your CGM sensor precision by calibrating it when on a fairly steady BG trend line. This is helpful anytime and every time you calibrate (i.e., enter a BG reading collected from your standard meter…make sure to use the best technique for this: if not…garbage in, garbage out).

Also, don’t over load the CGM device with all your daily blood sugars, that will often just confuse the software and give ??? readings or simply wrong output data.

One other tip is to aim to calibrate in the range you try to stay in. In other words, if you calibrate at a very high value (over 200 mg/dl), you might have difficulty getting accurate readings down in the 70-150 mg/l range.

Now on the first day of a new sensor session it’s ok to give the system a couple extra readings as the sensor settles in. This particular image is the “re-start” of the same sensor I’ve worn 3 full cycles, now starting a 4th. I might be able to get another week out of this. We’ll see. Share this tip with others as you wish.

Abbott Freestyle Test Strips Recall

Abbott Freestyle Test Strips Recall | www.IamaType1Diabetic.comOver the last few days, I’ve been receiving FedEx notes on the door. They keep coming at times when I am working…. but yesterday I was off. My fiance and I live in a two-family house (mother/daughter style), and we have our own entrance to the back side of the house. FedEx clearly would knock on the front of the house, not ring the doorbell, and I missed the package yet again.

Today, I decided to call FedEx and figure out exactly what was going on. I called today to schedule a pickup of the package from Abbott Diabetes Care, and FedEx destroyed the package!!! Yeah — I thought it woulda been strips, but apparently it was a flat envelope. Turns out, Abbott Diabetes Supplies, the maker of Freestyle Test Strips, had issued a letter describing a recall.  I, and all OmniPod users, use Freestyle Test Strips for our meters.

Abbott has told all OmniPod users to immediately stop using their meters, and use another one. Since I’m an OmniPod Veteran (yup, I just gave myself that title — and I actually really like it!)… I don’t have any of my old meters. I’ve been using OmniPod since 2006, and this is the first recall I’ve ever encountered.

To all of those other OmniPod users out there, what have you been doing if you don’t have another meter to use? I’ve only been using my OmniPod meter and honestly have no idea where my “old, old” meters even are (or if I still have them?) I have the older blue omnipod meter that I could use, but it’s annoying because it’ll keep beeping to tell me there’s “no active pod”.

If you haven’t heard about the recall as of yet, read below. If you have, and can help with some of my questions, scroll down and comment below.

IMPORTANT: URGENT PRODUCT RECALL
FreeStyle® Blood Glucose Monitoring System

February 19, 2014

Dear Valued OmniPod® Customer,

Recently, it has come to our attention that FreeStyle® Blood Glucose Test Strips may produce erroneously low blood glucose results when using the FreeStyle® blood glucose meter built into the OmniPod® Insulin Management System. Erroneously low blood glucose results that are not recognized may pose significant risks to your health.

Please take the following steps:

  1. If you are using the FreeStyle® Blood Glucose Meter built into the OmniPod Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM), you must discontinue use of any FreeStyle® Blood Glucose Test Strips you may have until you obtain replacement strips from Abbott Diabetes Care. To receive replacement strips at no cost contact Abbott Diabetes Care Customer Service at 1-877-584-5159.
  2. Continue using your OmniPod Insulin Management System (OmniPod) to deliver your insulin therapy. While waiting for your replacement strips to arrive, use the FreeStyle® Freedom blood glucose meter that you may have previously received with your welcome pack. FreeStyle® test strips when used the FreeStyle® Freedom blood glucose meter will produce accurate blood glucose results.If you would like to continue using the OmniPod system to recommend dosing, follow your OmniPod® Insulin Management System instructions for manually entering blood glucose readings.

    As always, control solution should be used to check the performance of your test strips and meter until you receive your replacement test strips. If any reading from a strip appears lower than you would expect or does not seem to match the way you are feeling, you should contact your health care provider immediately. Pay special attention to signs and symptoms of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia).

    Symptoms of high blood sugar may include: Excessive thirst, excessive urination, blurred vision, weakness, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms or are not feeling well, contact your health care professional immediately.

  3. Abbott Diabetes Care will provide further information when you call on the process to obtain your test strips going forward.FreeStyle® Blood Glucose Test Strips are the only strip type that is approved for use with your OmniPod® Insulin Management System. Please read your product information booklet and test strip insert carefully to ensure that you are using the correct test strip type for your OmniPod® Insulin Management system. OmniPod® Insulin Management System is not labeled for use with FreeStyle Lite® Blood Glucose Test Strips.

We recognize the importance of blood glucose testing and are committed to responding quickly to customers’ requests for replacement test strips.

We want to assure you that our first priority is you, our customer. We sincerely regret any inconvenience this situation may cause. If you have any further questions, please call Abbott Diabetes Care Customer Service.

Sincerely,
Kelly E. Duffy
Division Vice President, Quality Assurance and Compliance
Abbott Diabetes Care